Anthony A. Malo
Anthony A. Malo
Hometown: Montreal, Quebec
Team: Ice Hockey

Anthony A. Malo '51
Hometown: Montreal, Quebec
Sport: Ice Hockey
Year Inducted: 1985

In the history of Brown hockey, few lines have captured as much attention - and scored as many points - as the famous line of Don Sennott '52 at center, and Bobby Wheeler '52 and Anthony A. Malo '51 at the wings. In the 1950-51 season, theirs was the highest-scoring line in the East with 158 points. That record stood at Brown for 26 years. Tony Malo accounted for 38 of those points, and he probably would have had more had he not missed four games with an injury. In fact, he was ahead of Sennott - who finished as the East's high scorer - until the injury slowed him down. That was a banner year for Brown hockey, with the Bruin skaters advancing to the finals of the NCAA tournament at Denver. Malo made second team All-Pentagonal that year; he had been on the honorable-mention Pentagonal team the year before. Those who played with Malo praise his abilities as an outstanding defensive wing who always had his opponent checked and covered, and a great clutch player who did well in crucial games. "He was without equivocation the best corner man I ever played with or against," says Sennott today, "and I played professional hockey while I was in law school in Boston. Tony was also the fastest 'jump skater' on our team. For five years, he was perhaps the fastest in the college league. I used to have to lead him with my passes as he exploded." Wheeler believes that Malo had the most accurate backhand shot in college hockey at that time. "Any member of the '50 -'51 team," says Sennott, "will tell you that we would never have won as many games as we did without Tony's invaluable contributions to our records." Malo came to Brown from Montreal, where he graduated from Catholic High School. After leaving Brown, he played professional hockey in Europe for the Wembley Lions of England. He is now president and owner of Nelco, Inc., in Montreal, and notes proudly that he and his wife, Shirley, have been married for 30 years. They have two children, Peter, 27, and Susan, 25.